Richard Hull: The Murder of My Aunt

39884612Title: The Murder of My Aunt
Author: Richard Hull

Edward Powell lives with his Aunt Mildred in the Welsh town of Llwll. 
His aunt thinks Llwll an idyllic place to live, but Edward loathes the countryside – and thinks the company even worse. In fact, Edward has decided to murder his aunt. 

Rating: E

There are two types of crime-novels that are written from the POV of the murderer: In one he is an evil genius, a psychopath who comes up with ingenious (and often gory) ways to kill. The question is obviously not “Who did it?” but “How will he get caught?”, where’s the mistake that will trip him up?  I never cared about those (I want to be able to like the person in whose head I’m stuck while reading).

In the second, the killer is extremely likeable and the victim(s) aren’t. Often rapists, domestic abusers and other killers who were never caught. I’ve read and enjoyed a couple of those but there’s always a danger of exaggerating the evilness of the victims too much. They turn into moustache-twirling villains who kick puppies in their spare time and end up feeling not really human anymore (because that would mean the reader had to struggle with pesky morals).

The Murder Of My Aunt in a way is a bit of both. The aunt is horrible, but I also hated Edward – the narrator who plans the murder – after about two pages. He complains that he’s stuck in a small village (due to the in mystery-novels so popular inconvenient terms of a will that make him dependant on his aunt). It’s horrible and boring, it doesn’t even have a cinema (the horror) and worst of all: it’s in Wales and has a silly Welsh name. Because Welsh is a silly language, you see. No vowels and ridiculously many Ls. Isn’t that stupid? English is, of course, the superior language. It makes sense and the spelling is totally reasona…

Gif from Tatort: Wilhelmine Klemm laughing. Caption: HAHAHAHA

Yes, I get it. This was written in 1934. Back then such views were probably considered genuinely amusing…or at least only slightly obnoxious instead of a sign of an absolute jerk. But since it’s not the thirties anymore even though current politics…no let’s not go there, I do feel strongly about people mocking languages, and we are treated to Edward’s diatribe about Welsh at the very beginning of the book, I hated him immediately.

But at the same time, his aunt is also horrible. Not in the way patriarchs and matriarchs in mystery novels usually are: They are convinced that they are always right and that their children have to obey them. They might be aware that the child would be miserable but to them, it’s just an insignificant side-effect. The important thing is that everybody obeys them.

Edward’s aunt just wants to make him miserable. For example, she knows that Edward hates walking and so she decides to force him to walk to fetch a package from the post office. For that, she has to tell the postman that he should keep the package instead of delivering it (giving as reason that the label was torn), throw away the petrol of her own car so that Edward can’t use it, tell the owner of the local garage that he should refuse if Edward calls him and ask if he can deliver petrol and hide the phone-book so that he won’t find a different garage. That’s a lot of work for an idiotic prank. Because that’s all it is. She didn’t need him out of the house for any reason, she only wants him to walk because she knows he hates it.

At that point, I was willing to temporarily forget his comments on the Welsh and cheered for his plan to work because that would mean one less horrible character. And after all, his mistakes when setting up his murderous trap where so glaringly obvious that I was sure he would be arrested soon after the murder and my suffering would also soon be over. But alas, things don’t go as expected – for Edward and the poor, suffering reader – and in a different book I might have enjoyed the way things turned but here I just had to read more horrible people being horrible to each other and hated every page of it.

ARC provided by NetGalley

Mini Reviews – September 2018

Cover: Lia Cooper - Death Days Lia Cooper – Death Days
(Urban Fantasy, m/m romance)

DNF

I made it 30% into this book and I feel that at this point I should have a vague idea where the plot is going. But I had none. Things just happened. At first, Nick, our hero, tries to summon a demon but fails. He gives some lectures at university and it seems like he doesn’t exactly enjoy it (or care much about his student) which makes him incredibly likeable. His sister turns up and is horrid, there is some stuff with a magical council who want him to join but he doesn’t want to (why? For all I could tell because he is a contrarian jerk), he gets hunted by…something but escapes, his TA is hot, Nick is supposed to help the TA with his paper but he keeps being a horrible teacher. Then some vampire witches appear and threaten/warn him about…something. And that’s when I stopped. I didn’t know what was going on. I didn’t care about the hero. Or the fact that the only female characters that had appeared so far were horrible. And the weird forth and back between flowery, almost purple prose in some chapters and dull, functional in others didn’t help either.

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3413543David Dickinson – Death on the Nevskii Prospekt
(Historical Crime)

DNF

Lord Powerscourt is simply an a-ma-zing investigator but sadly his horrible wife has forced him at gunpoint (or at least while he was recuperating from one of the near-fatal wounds he got while being an a-ma-zing investigator) to promise her to give up investigating. Her very unpatriotic reasoning for that is that she would love for her children to not grow up fatherless. Now another mysterious crime has occurred that threatens the world (or at even worse – the British Empire) and only Powerscourt can help. There isn’t a single other capable person in Her Majesty’s service. So the whole first chapter is just a number of more and more important people throwing themselves in front of Powerscourt, begging him to take the case and telling his wife how unpatriotic her silly feelings are.

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OK, I’m not smiling. I’m just furious.


41722254Devan Johnson: Any Other Name
(Historical f/f Romance)

Fly, you fools

A badly formatted and unedited mess. The plot and I’m using that term quite wrongly is incoherent and reads more like multiple one-shots that were glued together. No character has any depth whatsoever. The side-characters are there to tell the main characters how great they are and the main characters seem to love each other because the sex is just so great. The plot-holes have the size of the grand canyon.

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39345944KJ Charles: Band Sinister
(Historical m/m romance)

Not my cup of Regency Tea

I’ve always loved Georgette Heyer and KJ Charles, but this book made me realize that I enjoyed both for very different reasons. The couples in Charles’ books usually both have experience. Perhaps not always on the romantic front but certainly on the sexual one. The romantic troubles they face are rooted in more than their lack of communication and they usually have bigger problems anyway (killers/demons out to get them, getting framed for murder etc.)
Heyer, on the other hand, is light-hearted, humorous, and the reasons that the couple can’t get together often involve miscommunication and/or horrible relatives. Now, Heyer usually manages to portray even the dreaded miscommunication in a way that doesn’t annoy me. The reasons the couple can’t (or won’t) talk to each other make sense and she usually writes with a twinkling eye that says “Yeah, they are a bit stupid but aren’t we all sometimes?”
KJ Charles manages to imitate all that perfectly. Some of the problems the couple face, are quite ridiculous – at least if you look at them from the outside – but it’s believable that for them it is a big deal. But at the same time, I kept thinking “Other KJ Charles-characters would be so much more reasonable about all of this.” Which is unfair of me. After all, it still works. I just don’t like it
I had also known from the blurb that this novel would feature a virgin hero. And just like the misunderstandings, the issue isn’t drawn out. There’s no panicked yelling of “But I’m not gay!” Guy soon admits that he always had certain urges, but he suppressed them. So, he quickly loses all objections to some sexy-times. And unlike many other virgin hero(ines), he doesn’t just lean back and lets the experienced partner take charge. He learns quickly (very quickly but which romance-character doesn’t?) and soon experiments and figures out his own wishes. And all of that is great, except that it made me realise I don’t care much for the Virgin!hero(ine) trope. So all in all this book isn’t bad, it just didn’t really work for me.

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